Volunteering

Roles in scouting/volunteering

Are you looking to volunteer in scouting? There are many different roles in scouting requiring and different set of skills and availability. It’s a common misconception that you need to know 100 knots and be able to navigate the Amazon with only a compass, this is not true and what ever skills you have if you want to be involved there is a role for you.

Executive (Group and District)

Chairperson

The Chair’s role is to oversee the Exec committee members, making sure that the committee fulfils its responsibilities to the group/district.

Time needed:

  • Be able to attend exec meetings, usually 4-7 meetings a year.
  • Be able to volunteer a few uncommitted hours a month.

Key responsibilities:

  • Objectively and impartially chairing and facilitating Executive Committee meetings.
  • Planning the annual cycle of Executive Committee meetings and setting the agenda for Executive Committee meetings.
  • Working closely with the Group Scout Leader/relevant Commissioners to ensure there are long term and short-term goals and how the role the Executive Committee can play in helping to achieve these.
  • Monitoring that decisions and actions agreed at Executive Committee meetings and ensuring that they are implemented.

Useful Skills:

  • Management skills
  • Communication and inter-personal skills.
  • Able to think creatively and solve problems.
  • Able to motivate others and encourage participation.
  • Ability to work as part of a team.


Treasurer


The role of the treasurer is to provide financial information and administration for the exec and group they support and to give guidance to keep the group financially stable.

Time needed:

  • Be able to attend/provide reports to the exec meetings, usually 4-7 meetings a year.
  • Be able to volunteer a few uncommitted hours a week.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Manage and monitor the financial activities of the Group.
  • Prepare and present financial reports and accounts to the Executive Committee.
  • Ensuring that all financial reports, annual statements of account and supporting documents (including receipts, cheque books and bank statements) are maintained accurately and in
    accordance with legal regulations.
  • Ensuring that the Group is financially able to function and has appropriate reserves and controls in place.

Useful Skills:

  • Accountancy/numeracy skills
  • Organisational skills
  • Communication skills
  • Able to think creatively and solve problems.
  • Previous experience of financial management or the role of a Charity Treasurer
  • Able to analyse financial information effectively.
  • Good IT skills
  • Ability to summarise financial information for different audiences.


Secretary


Secretary’s role is to supports the chair with the administration and the smooth running of the exec.

Time needed:

  • Be able to attend exec meetings usually 4-7 meetings a year.
  • Be able to volunteer a few uncommitted hours a month.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Provide administrative support to the running of the Executive Committee.
  • Work with the Chair of the Executive Committee to set meeting agendas and arrange meeting logistics for the Executive Committee.
  • Taking accurate and accessible minutes of Executive Committee meetings.
  • Distributing agendas, minutes and supporting documents for Executive Committee meetings.
  • Maintaining accurate records for the administration of the Group.
  • Communicating with the Executive Committee.

Useful Skills:

  • Organisational skills.
  • Strong communication skills.
  • Good IT skills.
  • Be able to record minutes quickly and accurately.


Exec members


An exec members role is to contribute to the smooth running of the group/district.

Time needed:

  • Be able to attend/provide reports to the exec meetings, usually 4-7 meetings a year.
  • Be able to volunteer a few uncommitted hours a month.

Key Responsibilities:

  • To be a full and active participant in Executive Committee meetings and activities.
  • Contribute to the strategic aims and future development of the Group/District.
  • A commitment to understanding and forming opinions on the key discussion points and responsibilities of the Executive Committee.
  • Willingness to complete various tasks which support the work of the Executive Committee and the aims of the Group/District.

Useful Skills:

  • Ability to work as part of a team.
  • Communication skills.
  • Able to think creatively and solve problems.
  • Willing to speak one’s mind and listen to the views of others.
  • Able to maintain independent and objective judgement.
  • Willing to actively design and contribute to the strategic vision of the Group/District.
  • Willingness to take decisions which will further the work of the Group/District.

District Team

Assistant District Commissioner/Deputy Assistant District Commissioners


An ADCs role is to help support the District Commissioner (area manager) in the organisation of one of the sections (Beavers/cub/scouts) of young people in the district.

Time needed:

  • Role is suited for some one who wants to volunteer with young people but is unable to commit to regular weekly meeting night.
  • Availability some weekends for events and camps

Key Responsibilities:

  • Assist Group Scout Leaders in the encouragement of all Leaders in the Section to provide a balanced programme.
  • Help coordinate and run events in the district.
  • Organise and run meetings with the districts section leaders.
  • Co-operate with the District Commissioner to support all Leaders and Commissioners in matters relating to the Section and its Leaders.
  • Support the DC in the development of the District.

Useful Skills:

  • Leadership skills.
  • Communication and inter-personal skills.
  • Able to motivate others and encourage participation.
  • Organisational skills.
  • Confidant to speak in front of large groups.


Active Support Unit member


The Active Support unit allows people to give their time to Scouting on a flexible basis. People can still be involved in Scouting without the full-time commitment of being a leader.

Time needed:

  • The flexible nature of Scout Active Support lends itself to people who want to be involved in Scouting and benefit from opportunities for flexible volunteering.
  • Scout Active Support can take up as much or as little time as the volunteer wishes.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Helping at events
  • Maintenance around the district.
  • Coordinate with other ASU members organising events.
  • Supporting the district

Useful Skills:

  • Communication skills.
  • Ability to work as part of a team.


Media Development Manager / Media Team


To improve the public image of Scouting by providing information and facts about Scouting to appropriate media

Time needed:

  • Whenever you have the time

Key Responsibilities:

  • Taking and collate images from around the district and at district events that can be used on the district website.
  • To regularly promote the image of modern Scouting organisation to media groups via local “awareness” campaigns.
  • To develop and maintain a list of local media contacts skills.
  • To monitor local media coverage and to feedback success stories to local Scouting and HQ PR team.
  • To seek out and identify local good news stories happening in Scouting and promote these to the local Media.

Useful Skills:

  • IT skills
  • Photography
  • Social media enhancement skills
  • Links in media (not essential)

Group/Unit roles

Groups Scout Leader/Manager


The role of a GSL is to manage and support all the members in their group. They need to be able to communicate with the District Commissioner (Area Manager) and their assistants to ensure the smooth running of the group within the district.

Time needed:

  • Be able to attend/provide reports to the exec meetings, usually 4-7 meetings a year.
  • Be able to volunteer a few uncommitted hours a week.
  • Availability some weekends for events

Key Responsibilities:

  • Ensure that the Scout Group thrives and has the best systems in place to support adult volunteers and develop the Group – including a Group Executive Committee and Section leadership teams.
  • Provide line management and support to the Leaders in the Scout Group, including setting objectives for their work and holding regular reviews and one-to-one meetings.
  • Ensure that the Scout Group has an adequate team of supported and appropriate adults working effectively together and with others to meet the Scouting needs of the area.
  • Ensure that a challenging, exciting, and balanced programme is offered to young people in the Scout Group.
  • Work with the District Commissioner, Deputy District Commissioner(s) and other Group Scout Leaders in the District to ensure that the District thrives and supports Scout Groups.

Useful Skills:

  • Ability to manage adults effectively.
  • Communication skills
  • Ability to construct and implement long-term plans that improve and expand the Scouting offered to young people and identify any training, resources and other needs required to undertake this work.
  • Ability to build, maintain and facilitate effective working relationships with a wide range of people.
  • Ability to plan, manage and monitor own tasks and time.
  • Able to work as part of a team and promote good teamwork.
  • IT skills
  • Experience of working with young people and/or community work with adult groups.
  • Experience of working in the Scout or Guide Movement as an adult (preferable but by no means essential)


Section Leader


A Section leaders’ role is to manage and lead the operation of the Section. In particular, the planning and delivery of the Balanced Programme, with the help their leadership team. Some of the tasks for which the Section Leader is responsible may be delegated to others in the Section.

Time needed:

  • Be able to commit weekly to the meeting night.
  • A few uncommitted hours a week to plan for section meeting and section admin
  • Availability some weekends for events and camps
  • Be able to attend leadership meetings amongst the section/group/district.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Delivery of a safe, exciting and stimulating Balanced Programme for the Section, taking into account the needs, interests and abilities of the young people.
  • Ensure that every young person in the Section has the opportunity to attend at least one nights away experience each year.
  • Actively support and promote the achievement of badges and awards in particular the Chief Scouts’ Award.
  • Actively work with other adults in the Group to support and promote Group/multi-section/districts activities and events.
  • Ensure accurate records are kept of the young people in the Section.

Useful Skills:

  • Leadership/management skills.
  • Organisation skills.
  • Communication skills.
  • Ability to work as a team.
  • Experience working with young people.
  • Teaching skills (whatever skills you have)
  • Experience of working in the Scout or Guide Movement (not essential)


Section Assistant Leader


ASLs role support the operation of the Section. In particular, the planning and delivery of the Balanced Programme, with the help of the leadership team. Some of the tasks for which the Assistant Section Leader is responsible may be delegated by the section leader.

Time needed:

  • Be able to commit weekly or fortnightly meeting nights.
  • A few uncommitted hours a month to plan for section meeting
  • Availability some weekends for events and camps
  • Be able to attend some of the leadership meetings amongst the section/group/district.

Key Responsibilities:

  • Support the delivery of a safe, exciting, and stimulating Balanced Programme for the Section, taking into account the needs, interests and abilities of the young people.
  • Ensure that every young person in the Section has the opportunity to attend at least one nights away experience each year.
  • Actively support and promote the achievement of badges and awards in particular the Chief Scouts’ Award.
  • Actively work with other adults in the Group to support and promote Group/multi-section/districts activities and events.

Useful Skills:

    • Some Leadership skills.
    • Organisation skills.
    • Communication skills.
    • Ability to work as a team.
    • Experience working with young people.
    • Teaching skills (knots, DIY, cooking, fire lighting, whatever skills you have)
    • Experience of working in the Scout or Guide Movement (by no means essential)

Section Assistant

Section Assistants are adult volunteers who assist the Section Leaders and Assistant Section Leaders in delivering the programme to young people in Scouting. It’s also a good role for someone who wants a leadership role but whose job makes it harder for them to commit to weekly meetings.

Time needed:

  • Be able to commit weekly, fortnightly or occasionally at meeting nights.
  • Availability some weekends for events and camps

Key Responsibilities:

  • Running games and activities as part of weekly section meetings and other section events.
  • Assisting young people to achieve badges and awards.
  • Assisting with residential experiences for the section.
  • Assisting the section with taking part in a varied, exciting and safe programme of activities.

Useful Skills:

  • Communication skills.
  • Ability to work as a team.
  • Experience working with young people.
  • Teaching skills (knots, DIY, cooking, fire lighting, whatever skills you have)
  • Experience of working in the Scout or Guide Movement (by no means essential)


Occasional Helper/Supporter


The role of Occasional Helper/Supporter allows people to give their time to Scouting but without the commitments of a leader, this could be by helping at the occasional meetings or events.

Time needed:

  • Availability some weekends for events/camps/meetings

Key Responsibilities:

  • No key responsibilities
  • Discuss with Group scout leader or district commissioner on how you could assist, this could be;
    • Helping at the occasional meeting.
    • Helping at camps.
    • Helping in kitchen at an event
    • Helping at events
    • Helping set up camps before the young people arrive.
    • Teaching a set skill to several groups such as DIY
    • Run permit activities such as archery.
    • Or any other way that could help a scout group.

Useful Skills:

  • What suits the role you have set out?

If you would like to volunteer with scouting in this district, please go to https://www.norfolkscouts.org.uk/join. If you want to help, there is a role for you.

There are also ways you could help the scouts in your area without taking a role, for example:

  • You’re a tree surgeon that could donate wood to scouts bonfire piles.
  • You would like to do a talk to sections about your job (police, guide dog trainer etc)
  • Would like to run a demo class (Zumba, Karate, etc.)
  • Could offer a discount service (plumber, electrician, etc.)
  • If this is you please get involved. No matter how small, there are many ways you can support scouting and any help is appreciated.
Put your phone down and what are you left with? Just teamwork, courage and the skills to succeed.’
Bear Grylls, Chief Scout Bear Grylls